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St. Patrick’s Day Watercolor Painted Pillow Cover

Posted in CRAFTS, DECOR, DIY, HOLIDAYS, St. Patrick's Day
on February 27, 2017

Top O’ the mornin’ to ya! Are you looking to do a bit of decorating for St. Patrick’s Day? One of the easiest ways to dress up a room with a theme is with a throw pillow. “Lucky” for you, I’ve got a fun idea for a painted watercolor 4-leaf clover pillow cover to share! #seewhatididthere

 

I didn’t use to do a lot of decorating or anything else for St.Patrick’s Day, but my family loves to celebrate it in some way every year. When I met Shay, I had no idea how much he loved St. Patrick’s Day. Little did I know that we would become the people eating corned beef and cabbage every year and drinking green beer. Well, I probably knew that we’d be drinking green beer, because Shay does like beer, but I had no idea on the corned beef and cabbage. I don’t like corned beef, and I’m indifferent to cabbage. I mean, I like cabbage in cabbage rolls, and of course, in coleslaw, but by itself, especially boiled, cabbage is just kinda.. eww. My man loves it – at least on St. Patrick’s Day. We once had an entire conversation about corned beef and cabbage that ended with Puff the Magic Dragon. True story. The point to my story is, over the years, I’ve had to up my St. Patrick’s Day decor and celebration game. A few years ago I whipped up these fun rainbow frosted brownie bites. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do this year, so you can bet I was super excited when my friend Meg of Green with Decor invited me to share a St. Patrick’s Day project idea, along with a group of fun and talented bloggers! Instant plan! Well, save for what we’ll be eating… but you work with what you have! On to the pillow cover!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Pillow form – Mine was a 10″x10″ form I already had. I wish I’d had a down filled form, but I didn’t have one the size I needed! If I’d had time, I’d have ordered this one.
  • Fabric to cover pillow – I had a package of white cotton napkins that were the perfect size for my pillow form, so I used that for the front of my pillow, and some velvet that I had in my fabric stock for the back.
  • Watercolor paints – Any type will do – they do not need to be fabric paints. I used this cake set, and I’ve also used this liquid version as well. You could potentially use your kids Crayola paints, but the colors won’t be as vibrant.
  • -Fine-tip black sharpie
  • -Iron
  •  -Fabric Medium –  This bottle of magic, when added to paint, allows you to use any type paint on fabric without leaving the fabric feeling stiff. I found this FolkArt brand at JoAnn’s, and was happy with the results, but could only find the small bottle there. If you’re using this for a larger pillow, it’s cheaper for the larger bottle on Amazon.
  • -Two small containers for water
  • -Two brushes

To begin, transfer the clover and text pattern onto your pillow using the marker. (Right-click on the link and save to your computer). I used my Cricut to do this, drawing it directly on the fabric with the fine tip pen. Because I wasn’t cutting the fabric, I was able to write onto the fabric without applying Wonder-under first.

If you don’t have a die-cut machine,  you can also apply the design with a fine point sharpie pen using one of these transfer methods, printing on fabric using printable fabric, or if your fabric is sheer enough, tracing the design by hand.

Whichever method you choose to use, you’ll need to heat-set your design before adding watercolor to the fabric. Do this by applying dry heat to the drawing from the highest setting of your iron.

Once your design is sealed, you can add your watercolor accents – the fun part! Fill your two containers with water – one for cleaning your brush and one for the fabric medium. You don’t need alot.. probably about 1/4 cup. Add about a 1/8 of a cup of fabric medium to one of the water cups.

Use one of the brushes dipped in water to wet your paint, keeping in mind, the less water you use, the more color your brush will pick up, the less water, the lighter the color and the more it will spread on your fabric.

Begin applying the color to your fabric, filling in the design, staying in the lines.. just like kindergarten! I used various colors of green to give the drawing dimension – there isn’t a right or wrong way to do this.

Once you have painted your fabric as desired, use the water with the paint medium added to it and paint over the entire surface. You may see a slight amount of run from the outline, but it should be minimal if you’ve heat set the marker.

Your fabric will be quite wet at this point. Allow your fabric to dry – My fabric took a few hours to dry in the air.  Once dry, carefully go over your lines if necessary, then again, heat set the design using a dry, very hot iron.

You’re ready to create your cover! I like a pillow cover with a zipper, but an envelope style pillow cover would also work here. Until I get around to writing a tutorial on how to create one, I like this one for creating a cover with a zipper a lot – it’s very thorough and easy to understand.

I added handmade pompoms in the corners of my pillow cover for just a little bit extra – I pinned the pompom strings from the inside to each corner before stitching.

I love how this cute little pillow turned out, and despite the fact that we’ll likely be eating the dreaded corned-beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day, adding this to our decor means at least we’ll be doing it in style! How about you? How will you be celebrating St. Paddy’s Day? Do you do any decorating? Do you have any “authentic” Irish dishes to share?

Before you go, be sure to drop by and visit these talented ladies for a peek at their St. Patrick’s Day projects!

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How I Made Over My Old Banker’s Chair

Posted in DECOR, DIY, OFFICE
on February 24, 2017

Many thanks to Wagner for the beyond useful paint sprayer and sponsoring this post. Of course, all opinions and bad grammar are my own. This post may contain affiliate links. Please see my disclosure for details.  

What do you do when you have a piece of furniture that has seen better days, but you can’t seem to part with it? The obvious answer is to paint it or upcycle it!

When my mother died, among many other things, I brought home her office chair. My mom was a workaholic. Not in the negative way that you would normally associate with the workaholic label. I don’t remember ever feeling like she didn’t have time for us, but many of our long talks took place around her desk, in her office. Her passion for work was simply a part of her – she thrived off of business savvy exchanges, constant learning, and hard work. And salesmanship? Whew! I swear, she could sell mud to someone in the middle of a flood. As a result of all of this, she clocked many, many hours in that chair. It is a piece of furniture that still means a lot to me and reminds me of her whenever I see it.

Unfortunately, the chair had seen better days. 12-years ago, the chair was gently used. But today, the chair was falling apart and needed a make-over, STAT. Somehow, the arms had both come off, and one was lost – I’m still holding out hope that it will turn up somewhere! Hopefully, I’m not the only one who loses things in their house! The faux leather seat was torn, and the finish was chipped and scraped all over. I gave the chair a new finish and recovered the seat. Usually I would have used a heavy duty fabric, but since I didn’t have one, I decided to paint fabric with a Buffalo check pattern for just a little bit of an on-trend look. To keep the cost down, I used a piece of canvas drop cloth as the seat cover and painted the pattern on using two colors.  I went with gray and beige shades to keep things neutral and light. A coat of clear wax keeps the chair pad protected. The color combination is very calming and a sweet contrast to the dark wood tones of our home office. Here’s how I did it:

 

Painting a Buffalo Check Pattern

Supplies you’ll need –

  • 1 1/2″ painters tape
  • Acrylic paint in 2 coordinating colors
  • Paint brush
  • Clear wax

Using the painter’s tape, tape two pieces, horizontally, side by side every 3″ across your surface.  This will create 3 x 3″ squares in the finished check.

 

If possible, run a small line of paint down the edges of your tape lines to seal the edges. This ensures a crisp line when you remove the tape. Allow this to dry.

Paint between the tape lines using your darkest color – I used a dark gray, and remove the tape before allowing the surface to dry.

Now, tape two pieces, vertically, side by side every 3″ across your surface going over the first set of lines. It’s best to start from the center to ensure an even pattern. Again, seal the edges and fill in the taped off area with your darkest color. ALLOW TO DRY.

Using the tape, create a grid by again adding tape lines horizontally, following your original tape lines, then paint the squares that have been set up by the grid of tape in your contrasting color – I used white. Remove the tape and allow to dry completely.

Brush on a coat of clear wax or another plastic coat sealer. If you’re painting this on fabric, this will also soften your fabric slightly, removing the stiff feeling of paint on fabric!

Covering the Chair Seat

To recover the seat, remove the seat pad from the chair. Most chairs have 2-4 screws attaching them to the base and will come right off when you remove these.

If the fabric underneath is in good condition, I’ve often left it on and just removed the cover piece – you know, that piece that covers the staples and makes it look all clean and pretty that I can’t remember the name of right now!? In my case, the fabric was torn and had to be removed. I did this with a pair of pliers, prying up the staples. Fun stuff.

To put the new fabric on, cut a piece of fabric roughly the same size as the chair pad, with enough fabric to wrap around all four sides.

Lay your fabric on a flat surface, pattern side down and center your cushion on top of it, face down.

Starting at the front of the cushion, pull the fabric up and around the seat and then turn over the raw edge and staple along the edge, about an inch in.  Repeat on each side, pulling the fabric taut and straight as you go.

To finish the corners, pull the center of the fabric over the corner, pulling tight and staple. Then, pull the fabric on either side of the center over, pleating and pulling taut, stapling around.  Cut excess fabric off and staple the edges down. Repeat on the other corners. Staple down the liner on the fabric staple line, turning over raw edges as you go.

Attach to the chair. All finished!

Painting the Chair:

To paint your chair, you’ll need to:

  • Make any necessary repairs
  • Prepare the surface – give it a good cleaning and lightly sand to remove any shine. This will help the paint to adhere better

I’ve had success with painting chairs using spray paint, and also by hand, but I decided to try out the Wagner paint sprayer that I received during our Game Room Makeover. #badhairdontcare #momjeansforpainting

Don’t worry, though, if you don’t have a paint sprayer, you can achieve the same look by painting by hand, using chalk paint and a polyacrylic coat for protection.

The sprayer I have (Wagner Flexio 890 Paint Sprayer) comes with two spray heads. One is for more detailed work such as crafts and furniture and was perfect for this job.

The sprayer is easy to put together and to use. It’s quiet and light. And, you can paint using virtually any kind of material. I used a chalk type paint which enabled me to apply the paint without a primer, followed by a thinned polyacrylic to protect the finish, both applied with the sprayer. I get asked all the time if you can truly use chalk paint without a primer, and the answer is YES! Chalk paint is lovely to work with and is most often self-levelling. It’s even nicer with the sprayer because there isn’t a brush mark to be seen anywhere. The best chalk style paint I’ve ever worked with is made by Wise Owl – it’s a bit pricey, but the coverage is fantastic. Take a look at this post for more information on Wise Owl paint.

Reassemble your chair, reattach the seat cushion and you’re done.

I added a flokati pillow that has been around for a while and has been moved from room to room multiple times – I love things that can live anywhere in your home! The pillow adds just the right amount of texture and softness. This secretary chair was a simple, quick, inexpensive upcycle. And, I can’t be happier with how the chair turned out – I’m positive my mom would have liked it as well, and I hope you do, too!

 

 

 

Faux Silver Leaf Mirror Makeover

Posted in BATHROOMS, CRAFTS, DECOR, DIY, WALL ART
on January 31, 2017

Happy Monday or wait.. it’s Tuesday! How did that happen?! Wow, we packed a lot in this weekend! We saw the cute Moana movie which made us all tear up a bit and watched the youngest guy play basketball. It’s been a crazy few weeks! Last weekend ended with me taking in the Twenty One Pilots concert with my daughter (so fun), at which point I realized just how old I am.. Staying up until 1:00 AM had me feeling more than a little off my game for the entire week! The fact that the band covered “No Diggity” makes up for it, though. 🙂

Those of you who’ve been following along during the $100 Room Challenge know that I recently transformed my over-the-sink mirror with a faux silver leaf (aka aluminum foil!). I decided to share with you today how that all came together.

This is how the mirror looked when I started – not terrible but not in-line with the look I was trying to achieve in the new bathroom!

I was more interested in it looking like this, but buying a new mirror wasn’t in the budget, which made it a perfect time for an inexpensive DIY.

For this project I used the following:

Step 1: Remove the mirror from the frame. This was a little bit tricky, but we used an Exacto knife to cut away the existing glue.. be careful not to remove any of the mirror finish.

Step 2: Cut the foil into strips. I did this using a ruler. Lay the ruler flat onto a piece of foil, bend the ruler over the ruler and tear down along the edge of the ruler. You’ll want more than you’ll think you need – I cut about 50 square feet of foil for this mirror – and you’ll want them to be about 1″ wide. Don’t worry if they aren’t exact.

Step 3: Working on a small section at a time, brush the wallpaper paste onto the frame and begin to apply strips of foil, smoothing them with the smoothing tool by gently applying pressure while running it over the foil with the edge. Be careful to remove any air bubbles. I put the foil shiny-side down, but either side will work. Continue to apply pieces to the surface, overlapping edges and smoothing with the smoother until the entire surface is covered. Let dry then gently wash off any excess paste. You’ll be surprised at how resilient the foil finish is!

Step 4: With a lint-free cloth or paint brush apply a coat of stain onto the foiled surface, working in a circular motion as though it were a glaze and remove any excess. You want to work the paint into the crevices, folds, and cracks of the foil which will give it an aged and textured look. The foil will NOT absorb the stain like wood but it will give a nice patina and will dry if you do a thin enough coat. If you put it on too thick just remove it with a cloth and reapply where necessary. Let dry.

Step 5: I had used the larger pattern of the stencil set on my daughter’s upholstered headboard, but I wanted something more delicate for the mirror and used a much smaller banner style stencil from the stencil set instead. I didn’t really worry too much about lining up the placement and sometimes overlapped the pattern to fill in the space because I was mostly focused on the pattern being subtly visible giving the illusion that it was stamped metal.

Using a small amount of paint, apply the stencil pattern with the dark gray paint along the edge of the mirror.

 

Step 6: Apply the polyacrylic with a brush, being VERY careful not to remove the finish from the paint or stencil. I used two coats, letting them dry in between.

Step 7: Insert your mirror back into the frame and apply hot glue around the edge of the mirror at the back, concentrating on the corners.

Step 8: Hang your finished mirror, then pat yourself on the back, stand back and admire all of your hard work!

 

Although there are a lot of steps, this is a fairly straightforward project that yields fantastic results for next to nothing. If you do try this on your own, please, send me a picture of your finished project… I’d love to see!

Rather buy than DIY? Here are some alternatives to Doing-it-yourself!

 

I had SO much fun with this project and I couldn’t be more thrilled with the outcome. How about you? Are you ready for a new look for your bathroom mirror?

Don’t forget it, Pin It! 

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